Diabetes News from ScienceDaily

Learn about early diabetes symptoms, diabetic diet information, diabetes care, type 1 diabetes, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Read the latest medical research on diabetes.
  • Increasing vigorous exercise decreases risk of type two diabetes, cardiovascular disease in childhood
    Physical exercise can reduce the risk factors of type two diabetes and cardiovascular disease even in children, a new study shows. In a two-year follow-up of primary school children, sedentary behavior increased the accumulation of risk factors, whereas increasing the amount of vigorous exercise reduced it. This is one of the first follow-up studies to reliably demonstrate these associations in children.
  • Fat: A new player expands our definition of diabetes
    Type 2 diabetes is reaching epidemic proportions around the world. The World Health Organization reports that more than 422 million people suffer from the disease, including over 1.2 million in Australia alone. The consequences of diabetes can be dire (cancer, kidney failure, and heart attacks) and its prevalence is rising fast. There is an urgent need to better understand how diabetes progresses -- and how it might be stopped.
  • Effects of a high-fat diet may be passed on for three generations
    A high-fat diet in female mice affects their offspring's obesity, insulin resistance and addictive-like behaviors for three generations, according to a new study.
  • Nutrients may reduce blood glucose levels
    One amino acid, alanine, may produce a short-term lowering of glucose levels by altering energy metabolism in the cell.
  • Researchers show effectiveness of new noninvasive blood glucose test
    For those living with diabetes, monitoring blood glucose accurately is necessary to prevent diabetes-related complications. Researchers recently evaluated the accuracy of new technology to monitor blood glucose levels without needles or a finger prick. Early results show that the noninvasive technology measures blood glucose levels as effectively as a finger prick test -- without drawing blood.