Diabetes News from ScienceDaily

20 June 2019

Learn about early diabetes symptoms, diabetic diet information, diabetes care, type 1 diabetes, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Read the latest medical research on diabetes.
  • Fatty fish without environmental pollutants protect against type 2 diabetes
    If the fatty fish we eat were free of environmental pollutants, it would reduce our risk of developing type 2 diabetes. However, the pollutants in the fish have the opposite effect and appears to eliminate the protective effect from fatty fish intake. This has been shown by researchers using innovative methods that could be used to address several questions about food and health in future studies.
  • Biology of leptin, the hunger hormone, revealed
    New research offers insight into leptin, a hormone that plays a key role in appetite, overeating, and obesity. The findings advance knowledge about leptin and weight gain, and also suggest a potential strategy for developing future weight-loss treatments, they said.
  • Food neophobia may increase the risk of lifestyle diseases
    Your parents were right: You should always try all foods! Food neophobia, or fear of new foods, may lead to poorer dietary quality and increase the risk factors associated with chronic diseases.
  • Lower risk of Type 1 diabetes seen in children vaccinated against 'stomach flu' virus
    Vaccinating babies against a virus that causes childhood 'stomach flu' greatly reduces their chance of getting so sick that they need hospital care, a new study shows. But the study also reveals a surprise: Getting fully vaccinated against rotavirus in the first months of life is associated with a lower risk of developing Type 1 diabetes later on.
  • Vitamin D and estradiol help guard against heart disease, stroke, and diabetes
    Vitamin D and estrogen have already shown well-documented results in improving bone health in women. A new study suggests that this same combination could help prevent metabolic syndrome, a constellation of conditions that increases the risk of heart disease, stroke, and diabetes in postmenopausal women.