Diabetes News from ScienceDaily

25 September 2020

Learn about early diabetes symptoms, diabetic diet information, diabetes care, type 1 diabetes, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Read the latest medical research on diabetes.
  • Complications from diabetes linked to worse memory, IQ in children
    A new study uncovered that even one severe episode of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in children newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes is linked to cognitive problems; and among children with a previous diagnosis, repeated DKA exposure predicted lower cognitive performance after accounting for glycemic control.
  • Blood vessel growth in muscle is reduced in women after menopause
    A new study demonstrates that formation of small blood vessels is impaired in the muscle tissue of postmenopausal women. The study's findings highlight the importance of physical activity for women prior to and during menopause, as a means to prevent the development of disease later in life.
  • Fructose and glucose in high fructose corn syrup deliver a one-two punch to health
    Consuming high fructose corn syrup appears to be as bad for your health as consuming sugar in the form of fructose alone, according to a new study. The study reports health risks related to the type of sugar consumed, but also reveals novel risks when sugars are combined, which has important implications for dietary guidelines.
  • Metformin for type 2 diabetes patients or not? Researchers now have the answer
    Metformin is the first-line drug that can lower blood sugar levels in type 2 diabetes patients. One third of patients do not respond to metformin treatment and 5 per cent experience serious side effects, which is the reason many choose to stop medicating. Researchers have now identified biomarkers that can show in advance how the patient will respond to metformin treatment via a simple blood test.
  • Children who take steroids at increased risk for diabetes, high blood pressure, blood clots
    Children who take oral steroids to treat asthma or autoimmune diseases have an increased risk of diabetes, high blood pressure, and blood clots, according to new researchers. The study is the first to quantify these complications of oral steroids in a nationwide population of children.